A #WriteTip for Fellow Novel Virgins

Stardate 94799.93

Short #writetip for my fellow #novelvirgins

I have been researching my first novel for seven months. Seven. Granted, I took a break over the Thanksgiving/Christmas period because it just became too much with normal life. But that’s the trick, isn’t it? Knowing when too much is just…too much?

I don’t know how it is for other first-time novelists, but I have found that I can’t research/write every single day. This past weekend I went through three volumes of non-fiction on the Homestead Strikes of the 1800s in one day. To quote the Wheel of Fortune game, THAT’S TOO MUCH!! (points if you know what I’m talking about!)

I have found my research and my epiphones come in waves. One line of research can inspire a whole paragraph chicken-scratched in the next page of my journal that had originally been earmarked for, well, more research quotes.

Knowing when to take little breaks has been learned the hard way. As a first-time novelist you know you are working at your own pace. You don’t have an editor or a publicist asking you for your next set of chapters, or if your book is going to be a trilogy, or potential readers (yet!) asking you questions you don’t know the answers to yet. Don’t let yourself burn out before you get to the meat of your idea.

It’s okay to take your time, you novel virgin! You’ll know when you’re ready to pick it back up!

#keepcalmandwriteon


Why You Should Research Your Historical Novel

Stardate 94766.96: #writetip

Every writer has to start somewhere. Every potential author needs to know that they don’t know everything. That, quite honestly, is one of the cold hard truths of the fast-paced publishing world. When I started this book last September, all I had was one tiny idea. One tiny element that would eventually grow to be this beast of a project where I am consistently learning new things.

If you’re going to write about a certain time period, KNOW that time period. You can’t write on the mid 1800s if all you’ve seen on the subject is a single film version of Jane Eyre. You have to immerse yourself in it. Be analytical of the content you find and be extremely picky of what you choose to include in your own nonfiction.

For first-time writers the task can be daunting at first. It was for me when I realized how little I knew. Some authors can pick up their pen and crank out half a novel in a night. Don’t let yourself become discouraged if you find yourself getting stuck. That’s what the research there is for! If you’re not sure what type of hat your character could have worn, or why they believe what they believe, or if the town you chose for your backdrop is the proper setting for your climax, research it.

Another truth: readers will know, and want to know, why you chose the details you put in. Your readers will also be able to pick up on false facts, especially if you’re writing something historical. Granted, it will be your take on events that actually happened, but be prepared to be able to explain the why.

Is research daunting? Yes. But you will not only find connections in the process but gain a wealth of knowledge on your subjects that you may otherwise have never known.