Lazy Language: A Short Analysis of Linguistic Pet Peeves

Picture it.

You’re sitting in a café, in your favorite spot on the patio with your favorite drink when someone says it. That. Phrase. The phrase that sends chills up and down your spine. The phrase that your friends can’t understand why it makes you uneasy. I am sure that there is a psychological study out there that sufficiently explains why our bodies react the way they do but I am no neurobiologist who can find that easily. I can, however, sum it up into two simple words: Lazy Language. The problem is that everyone uses it, and everyone has their own pet peeves when it comes to it.

The “Delish” Culture 

Advertising is everything. Companies will be forever pushing the next season of products long before the current one has finished. When television shows coin their own terms, like “delish,” we all embrace it. Advertising has become so engrained in our American culture that it is almost expected. Catch phrases are so commercialized that companies spend millions to have theirs air during major sporting events. Can the think tank behind this be appeased by all of us turning our devices off to it? Most likely, no. But it is by no means lazy. Scores of research and debate goes into what is eventually put out. And while it’s not always steeped in proper grammar it gets stuck in your head. That’s why I consider advertising a pet peeve because every one of us buys into it on some level. The key: don’t let the ever-constant consumerism overtake your daily life and influence your decisions in the wrong way.

The “Thank You Much!” Culture

It is no secret that language changes with everything else. No one speaks Shakespearean anymore unless they’re in a literature class, an artist, or an aspiring play write. Who would walk up to a complete stranger and start using wherefores and thereofs? While it is completely romantic to fantasize about that period, it is rather impractical.

“If I profane with my unworthied hand
this holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:
My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
to smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.”                   ~Romeo~

Undoubtedly romantic, but outdated nonetheless. It’s been replaced by shortened phrases spoken out loud that should remain in text form, i.e. LOL, ROTFL, OMG, just to name the acronyms. “Thank you much,” in this writer’s mind, is just as cringe-worthy. We are starting to sacrifice daily conversation in the interest of getting things done more quickly. And in my mind, it just doesn’t work.


What are some words or phrases you hear in your daily lives that make you cringe? Perhaps it would be prudent to find out why they cause you so much angst. What’s worked for me is taking steps to eliminate the habits from my own life. I constantly resist the urge to use “lol” overbearingly in Tweets and texts (though not always completely successful), and I think carefully before I speak to make sure I don’t make any more linguistic faux pas to better verse myself in varied word choice.

But to each their own, I suppose. We can only focus on our own habits; we cannot force the world to always use proper grammar. Heaven knows this casual blog attempted to do so at 10 PM on a Sunday evening.

Happy reading.
Happy writing.
Keep Calm and Research On.

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